Spring Cleaning

strike-offs

After dedicating way too much time to our school auction, I am finally getting around to getting my house organized so I can get ready for new fabric to arrive! My next collection for Kokka, Monochrome, will be shown at International Quilt Market in Minneapolis in May. I used some touches of gold metallic again, plus there’s silver in this collection as well. The title is Monochrome because each fabric is in shades of one color, but there are a variety of colors in the collection. I’m showing you a few from the neutrals today.

And I finished our school-wide auction project. It turned out much like the plan shown in the previous post, but I layered the leaves a bit. Done is good!

bloom mandala

mandala-detail

 

Auction Projects

auction-mandala

This year, I’m again working on my daughter’s elementary school auction project. We decided to make a flower mandala, so I designed this to be made with almost 400 children. I made each grade a ring of the mandala (PP-6th grade), so there was math involved. Boo. Each grade is using a different technique on a square piece of paper, then we’re cutting the shapes and mounting them to the white background, which will then be framed. The finished piece will be around 36″ square, so the pieces are pretty tiny. Anyone want to offer framing services? Really.

The kids are doing watercolor with salt, collage and painted paper, styrofoam printing, pastel and watercolor relief, tissue paper collage, zentangle, and cross-hatching. Luckily, our school art teacher makes the art with the kids so all I have to do is assemble the piece. I hope to have the piece ready in a couple of days. Fingers crossed.

auction-project

Scarecrow

ghoul-scout

Creepy, isn’t it? October always is always a busy month for us. With Quilt Market, a trip to Portland, and Halloween costumes and events, we’re having an extra busy year.

My daughter’s fourth grade girl scout troop made this scarecrow “Ghoul Scout” for the Atlanta Botanical Garden. She actually turned out a bit creepier than we intended, but the girls were enthusiastic and this was the right age for getting a bit scary. The photo above was taken right after we dropped her off and she still has a tag pinned on her front. We haven’t been to the garden to see her in place yet, but she’ll be on display throughout October. And it looks like she’s won second place in the non-professional category, which should be exciting for our kids who worked so hard!

ghoul-scout-badges

The girls made badges for the Ghoul Scout that you can see below, and I was impressed with their grotesque creativity! The badges include “puppy scaring”, “human head basketball”, “blood tea party”, and one of my favorites — “killing rainbows.” Pretty great. We even added a box of “Skin Mints.” This was my 11-year-old’s idea and she came up with the list of disgusting ingredients like flaking soda and hydrogenated toes. Gross, huh?

Indie Craft Experience Summer Camp

ICE-summer-camp-for-kids

Have a crafty kid? The Indie Craft Experience here in Atlanta is offering a camp for kids ages 8-12 this summer! Click here for more details.

Tiny Houses

house-project-image

We just finished up our all-school auction project. Last year I made a quilt with the kids, with the children each dyeing a piece of fabric. I paper pieced that quilt and it took many, many hours. So this year, we decided to try an art project instead. Since I’d always wanted to make a quilt of little houses, we decided to make a project with tiny wooden houses, each cut from balsa wood in varying shapes. The finished piece is 36″ x 48″, so each house had to be around 2″ wide and tall to allow 386 houses to fit on the wooden background.

Once I’d cut the houses, I passed them along to our school art teacher Kelley, who had each grade use a different technique to design their houses. Techniques included Pollack splatter painting for the youngest kids, Kandinsky houses with pastels for pre-K, Mondrian houses for kindergarten, plus pointillism, tissue paper overlays, paper mosaics, acrylic and sharpie, and black and white Zentangles. Some of the houses were representational and some abstract. Kelley did an amazing job with the kids and we were both surprised at how much detail they were able to get on these small houses. Then I painted the background with acrylic paint, glued each house on with wood glue and varnished the finished piece. I think that all of the individual and unique houses coming together in one project is such a sweet metaphor for our school community.

house-project-detail